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of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra. a symbol. showing that we are as much as the men. maybe we first tried to lo
that his dream and his words and the education that we have from dr. king stays alive for generations to come. so, this is truly an amazing event today. dr. king in 1967 asked, where do we go from here? and today we're still asking that same question. where do we go from here? well, we still have people suffering in our community, people in the african-american community. where do we go from here when we have lost numbers of african americans in san francisco? where do we go from here? well, i'll tell you where we go from here. (applause) >> we change policy of the city. we change policy, and we start to be progressive, truly progressive about the policies we push to make african americans feel welcomed in this city. so, where do we go from here? we start to make aggressive efforts to educate our young people. we take ownership of our community. we take ownership of our children. we support each other instead of pointing the finger. where do we go from here? (applause) >> there is much work to do. as supervisor cohen and i cannot do it alone, we need your support. we need your encoura
government at home and abroad. >> rand paul wants to accomplish the departments of education and congress and epa. >> small detail. >> and the federal reserve and abolish the income tax. the second amendment which does not allow in his opinion for any form of gun control whatsoever. he makes mitt romney look looks michael due dukakis. >> i paint in primary colors. >> these are details. >> they are details i would just as soon ignore. on some of those fronts. but, again, overall, the primary message that he delivers is less government at home and restraint abroad which you know what? the republican party has been reckless over the past decade. we have paid a lot for it with our philosophy. and so i think he's a good symbol like his father. listen. i voted for his father in the republican primary in 2012. did i agree with what he said about 9/11? >> god, i hope not. >> absolutely not. there are a lot of things that rand paul said i think are way out there and i disagree with, but the core issue of small government at home and restrained foreign policy abroad, i will -- >> not a realistic se
grandson, henry adams, remembered louisa catherine fondly. in his works, the education of the adams, he described louisa catherine and her role in this house and relationship with the family. he felt that she was the odd man out, because she was born in england and educated in france. she remained a foreign personality to many of the adams's. he recollects her sitting in her paneled room, using her silver tea pot that that she brought with her from her home in england to the old house. she would entertain both herself and many guest in this room. john quincy adams and louisa would inherit this home from john adams. i thought about selling it, but then decided that it was important to the family story to hold onto the house for future generations. >> you can visit there today. >> yes. >> wonderful. where the papers? >> they are at the massachusetts historical society in boston. they used to be at the old house would distill my very, but they were transferred to the historical society for safekeeping. >> a question on facebook from genie webber. i have read excerpts from her autobiography
the insurance they need or the subsidies they need to get educated. she is trying to gain sympathies here for rich preppy white house staffers that need to pay $7 for a nice meal in the cafeteria in d.c. and now they want to raise it to $10. is that what i'm getting from her? >> clayton: she says the quality of the food. if you look at the quality of the food, even lowering it it's still better than the school lunches most of our kids get to eat across this country. >> alisyn: you mean mystery meat? [yuck] >> peter: what was that pink slime they had coming out of tube. >> clayton: we used to have cheese dream take hamburger bumps the enriched flour ones break it in half and drizzle cheese ton and melt it and that was lunch. >> alisyn: that sounds delicious. the food i had in my cafeteria completely indefinable. it was just a sort of. >> clayton: jell-o. >> alisyn: gentlemen -- gelatinous. i think it was a kung pow chicken thing. let us know what the most heart breaking sequester cut you have heard is find us on twitter. are you on twitter? the neys are 49. without objection. >> the senate
education, we need to make sure we protect medicare and what we've seen and the alternative is they don't do that. that create as voucher program for medicare. >> we certainly agree on the opposition to a recession. senator corker, you going to vote for this budget? >> no, i'm not. i don't expect you think i would. it really doesn't address any of the major issues that we need to be dealing with. there's no entitlement reform. republicans would like to see a 75 year fix for our entitlements so that we'll see, know those will be here down the road. if you want to know the truth, larry, neither budget does the things that need to be done for our country but i will say two nights ago we passed a cr, first time since i've been in the united states senate in six years and to months. i was able to vote for a bill that cut real spending. we'll go through this budget process and the democratic budget obviously as you just mentioned doesn't do what it needs to do. republican budget could do more, maybe there's a remote chance that we have a conference that actually addresses the big issues of the da
? we've solved a problem in our society, how to educate the next generation. and let me tell you, this is an important matter. we economists believe that the single most important factor shaping the future of any economy in the world including the united states is the quality and the quantity of the educated trained labor force it produces. college and universities are where we do that. if we're crippling an entire generation with debts they cannot support and jobs that will not encourage them to continue in their studies we are as a nation shooting ourselves in the foot going forward. it's a demonstration of the dysfunctionality of our system. and then the question comes could we forgive the students' debts? well, it's an interesting idea. but how then do you go to the people who can't afford their credit card debts or their home debts or their mortgage debts -- they're all hurting. and the students have a special claim, i give them that. and we need those students, i understand it. but we have to go at the root of a society which allows unspeakable wealth to accumulate in the h
? >> what i mean is that my education, i have been looking at old movies that i love. we speak about the reputation of the parisian, which was supposed to dress very well. i think that, you know, in france, the eccentricity -- for me, eccentricity is very chic and it is what i love. it is so much about the good taste, which paralyzed. it is still a city where everybody meets profession, sure, but it is sad that you did not seek only may be in the young people, but you do not see when people are in the rain, let's say, in society, like having the joy to address. like you have to be like the color of the street of paris. you ought not to be remarkable. it is very demanding of the people. so i said to the people, no, we have to be like everyone else. in london, it was completely different, and it still is. more distance that makes them, for me, more fascinating than the french. >> we want to take questions from the audience, but i did just want to ask you a quick question about your work in movies because that has been so extraordinarily exceptional. i think probably a lot of people --
, but john did. >> she was born in england and educated in france and she remained a phone personality to many of the adams, but not to henry as a world traveler herself. she was very well educated, very sophisticated socially i would say. she sort of entertained john quincy's road to the white house. >> she was not happy about returning to washington as the wife of a congressman. >> louisa catherine adams essentially became the campaign manager for her husband, john quincy adams' run for the presidency in 1824 by dominating the capital city's social circuit. following a contested election, the adams' four years in the white house were a turbulent period in american politics and washington society. we'll look at louisa adams' relationship with her husband john quincy adams and john and abigail on the road to 1600 pennsylvania avenue. good evening and welcome to our continuing series on first ladies influence and image in partnership with the white house historical association. the next installment is on louisa catherine adams, the wife of john quincy adams. we have two guests at the ta
the conference is about. educating mailers on how to grow your mail and how to use the u.s. postal service to help you mail better. >> reporter: outside the conference, postal workers protested the proposed service cuts, including ending saturday deliveries. but one worker's son says he hopes the conference will help reinvent the postal service. >> a lot of people are losing their jobs. people are being relocated outside the state. >> reporter: the usps says they are watching their cost by sending 160 fewer employees to the conference this year. and they are paying $155 for each hotel room, a 40% discount. sharon chin kpix 5. >> the conference runs through wednesday. the workshops include more efficient mail packaging and extreme weather. >>> like many public officials caught up in a scandal, this man insisted that the allegations against him were a distraction and a political lynching. but tonight a jail sentence looms for the tomorrower law make -- for the former lawmaker. we were in the courtroom for the guilty plea. >> reporter: the former supervisor agreed to the -- supervisor greeted
. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. and contributions in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - hi, neighbor! today is thank you day! we say thank you to everyone we love! so thank you for coming over today! happy thank you dayyyyy! thank you day! thank you day! it's thank you day! grr!
of world war i, so they thought to make up for the loss and interruption of their education, thegd send them all to university for six months just to round out their education. blackett was sent to cambridge, and he said one day i wandered over to the cavendish laboratory to see what a scientific lahr story was like, and very shortly after that he told the navy i want to become a scientist. he never did receive a ph.d., but he quickly became one of the world's foremost physicists for the work he did in the 1930s discovering the positive terror, the positive electron, the first piece of antimatter whose existence was confirmed. he would win the nobel prize in physics in 1948. he was good looking, had an extraordinary combination of hands-on ability and theoretical imagination. his colleagues remarked they'd never known anyone his equal in his ability to conceive of a problem in physics, write out a few lines of mathematics, design an ap apparatus, build it himse, carry out the experiment, analyze the results. he was also one of a number of scientists in britain and america who had been w
it is something that i would love, it is just pure passion and it is also a self-education of mine on display and my own interest. and i think i will wrap it up. thanks. [ applause ] >> so for those of you who came in late, if you could hold your questions, we are not going to do a formal q, and a, but i will ask each of the panelists to stick around and if you want to chat with them one on one, they will be veil for a little while to do that. our next panelist is melissa. they earned her ba in 2005 and her ma in 2007. she worked in new york at christie's auction house and the time warner center, the museum experience includes the research positions in new york and the victor annual beter museum in london. she has been a member of the curtorial team of san francisco since 2008. and currently holds the position of assistant curator for european art. it has supported works from the 15th century, such as the mourners, cultures from the court of bergandy to the 19th century, including van gogh, and beyond master pieces. and she served as the assistant curator for the blockbuster, girl with the pe
their education and they're willing to hold classes without a classroom. stick around. [ male announcer ] with free package pickup from the united states postal service a small jam maker can ship like a big business. just go online to pay, print and have your packages picked up for free. we'll do the rest. ♪ we'll do the rest. >>> welcome back to "around the world." this is our favorite story of the day. off the coast of south africa some tourist get a little too close for comfort with one of these great whites. check it out. [ bleep ]. >> whoa! [ bleep ]. >> i love the beeps. i would absolutely be beeping. and the guy under water in that cage, he's beeping into his mask. >> this is a close-up of the shark's teeth. the mouth there. they thought they were actually safe inside the cage. okay. that is just -- >> what they do is put bait outside the boat to attract the great whites. and then come along and put on a show and bite the bait. this guy headed straight for the divers tank and tried to get in and get the real thing. >> the entire head inside the cage. narrowly missing the tube t
to talk about this bigger issue of how education is changing dramatically in america as we move from textbooks to online learning. and in the past, each state and in texas the state board of education, would review textbooks to be sure the information was right and that there wasn't a bias. and that that textbooks would be distributed and parents could see them. they've been approved. today, we have an onslaught of online products by c-scope, which was not involved in this particular lesson. >> megyn: that's the other that has the agenda in texas. >> right, that's the other entity and now you have safari montage with this video and talked to the state board of education. we've had 1300 bids, up dramatically, from textbook publishers for online curriculum because they're making the transition. now, we obviously want to stay up with technology in our schools. it's less expensive to deliver the product this way. students are more engaged in technology than they are in ready heavy textbooks, but we've lost control, megyn, and this really concerns me. now, safari montage, if you look on t
of things simultaneously and trying to educate ourselves, if you will, truly it's a fact-finding mission for us right now to determine what that background consisted of and where that leads us is yet to be known. >> all right. and then now a finally all colorado corrections facilities are under lockdown through the weekend. so is that just a precaution or are you concerned there could be more violence? >> well, i can't speak to the increased security that the department of corrections is exercising at this point. obviously they have to make sure that they do their own asse assessment and what they feel might be remaining risks or not and make decisions accordingly. and then we recognize that amongst various executives across the state that's something that we're actively engaged in in terms of providing additional security from our perspective. but we realize that because there is no conclusive, you know, ending to this case yet, it's unknown on whether or not there is a remaining threat or not. >> lieutenant kramer, thank you for taking the time. the latest information we have from texa
school children in new york. educators have given a green light to english curriculum that includes picture books with realistic portrayals of war for 8-year-olds. one contains fighter planes dropping bombs on a middle eastern town. another depicts an abduction of a young man from his home. it will be used in the third through 5th grade. >> a colorado sheriff taking a stand against two aggressive new gun control managers. john cook says he won't enforce expanded background checks on firearms purchases or a 15 round limit on ammunition magazines. criminals are still going to get their guns. democratic governor is expected to sign the measures into law. >>> an oregon girl is being hailed as a hero saving her family from a fire. the 7-year-old says she woke up in the house filled with smoke. she woke up her brother, her father and his girlfriend. >> i opened the door i and i cannot see. >> it was kind of surreal. walked out and freaking out inside trying to stay cool on the outside. get everybody out of the house. >> where the drier used to be so hot it milted t-- melted the sink. >> f
education from oakwood college and california university where she obtained a master's degree in psychology. ms.felder started in the city as a clerk with child crisis and worked her way up to management, to the management level and is now the director of the city's integrated response system. she has demonstrated exemplary leadership, administratively and in the field. she is well loved by her staff as you can tell, and lead her staff by example, working with a team and not above them. she has a hands-on -- she's a hand on manager who doesn't just sit behind her desk, but works closely with her team. and directly with victims and their loved ones. she believes that mental health services need to be brought directly to communities. she is proactive in setting her team to neighborhoods with the greatest need for behavioral health services to engage the community through activities and to build the relationships and trust so that those who may need services and support can be more open to seek the help that they need. to this day she participates in weekly meetings with the street violence re
in pakistan and got attention as she pushed for education rights for girls. she has a reason to celebrate in her new home. >> paula faris behind the wheel, learning firsthand about driving distracted when her kids are demanding her attention from the back seat. the safety lessons she learned that could happy any parent. >>> first the historic visit by president obama to israel. the first time mr. obama visited the jewish state in his presidency. he will be greeted in tel aviv by top israeli leaders and then whisked to high-level meetings. >> the trip is expected to be rich in symbolism, and a speech by the president to israeli people to pledge friendship and security. >> with the mideast in turmoil and because of so much uncertainty in the region the trip is a high profile one. >> alex marquardt is in jerusalem. where the president meets with prime minister netanyahu today. alex, good morning, the trip we hear so much about symbolism is that code for not a lot of substance. break it down for us. >> reporter: good morning, yeah, i think you are absolutely right. the trip
. so now we have two women on the board. you have to educate women that they shouldn't accept something that doesn't make sense but it is, as a ceo, male or female, you're responsible for doing the right thing and if you're public for your shareholders, which is women represent 55% of the workforce now. so it's crazy not to pay them the same. >> is this going to make an impact, this book? >> i think it has. look at john chambers at cisco putting out a memo to his company saying they haven't done enough. not just on the pay gap but the percentage of women that are at management level. i think it's already made a huge impact. >> let's turn to this tax issue. we have seen amazon deal with it on a state by state basis. the stock hasn't really reflected the sort of lingering concern over state sales tax spp this a game changer for the industry or not? >> well, i think -- i think what's happened is this was supposed to be a few years and it's now been about 20. so i think it was good at the beginning but it's been unfair to other retailers, which is why should -- if either everybody collects
training for boys, the latest weekly class on offer in high schools courtesy of hamas's education ministry. at this one the principal says every student has enjoyed. >> we learn about strength and jihad god willing. >> this 16-year-old and his classmate say they don't know if they'll join one of gaza's many militant groups, but there's no doubt this is fertile recruiting ground. one of the things these high school students don't need to be taught is what it feels like to be in war. they have all experienced it. and they all believe the fight between gaza and israel will never end. >> translator: for me personally i've lost three people dear to me in the war. >> the trainers themselves are military men. >> translator: the goal is to teach them to get accustom to manhood. why are you singling us here in gaza? even in china and western countries even have similar programs. >> including the united states. high schools there have a military program called junior rotc. why should gaza be any different, he says. except gaza is different. the u.s. and several other countries have deemed hamas, whi
and educating them with programs we have available. we have half one billion families and kids who have been affected for the past two years. that opportunity does not come to every company in america. we are only getting started. i like what we are doing. has locked in the olympics for the next few years or so. really for-profit enterprise when that is done? >> we have publicly said that we have broke even to a slight profit on london. our credit processor in vancouver and beijing said they lost a couple of million dollars each. within 120 days of abiding the company, we were faced with "lo cked up" -- an auction to either buy it or not buy it for the next decade. it is not something we had done very often. i have to tell you that i am very glad we stomached it and said to go for it. fors a fantastic platform our company. we launched "the voice" during the olympics. it is the most successful show on nbc. the olympics and london was down 10%. --i in london was 10%. beijing had michael phelps winning 10 medals. we went from $200 million loss to break even. if that continues, it will prove to
, education and voting and that, in fact, the more, the higher socioeconomic classes, the more education, the less likelihood one is to vote for islamists. and, in fact, we could even -- and some of the data shows this -- that less education, um, lower wealth one is more likely to vote for not justice lammists, but the salafi groups and so on. so i i think that's a very, very important -- and i think that's in line with the findings and the arguments that are made here. i also think that the other general trend without overemphasizing it is also valid, and that is that we are likely to see decreasing electoral strength for islamists generally. and there are many reasons for that. some quite simple, that is that, you know, up until 2011, up until the egyptian uprising islamist groups, in particular the muslim brother hood, are really the only serious political actors other than mubarak's ruling party that actually took elections seriously. and there was good reason for that. if you were a rational voter in egypt under mubarak, you stayed home because you knew that your vote didn't mean an
kids -- i think teachers can use this as a really good educational tool in the classroom, to take kids to places that you normally can't get to. >> obviously, not their car with the fancy camera. a little backpack. >> right. and they didn't walk the whole mountain. they didn't do every single piece of the mountain. it's not every footstep, but more than we've had before. >> all right. back to your basketball game. we know you've been watching the whole time. >> i'd rather get back to the basketball game than you singing the boyz ii men lyrics. >> another story. my talent appearance. mario, thanks for reminding everybody. we're back with the story of one dog's see -- seeing one dog's seeing-eye dog. you get it, right? after these messages. [ lane ] are you growing old waiting for your wrinkle cream to work? neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair has the fastest retinol formula. to visibly reduce fine lines and wrinkles in just one week. neutrogena®. here's a better idea. pillsbury grands! flaky layers biscuits in just 15 minutes the light delicate layers add a layer of warmth to your next d
, and the education secretary has turned and the whole country can see what is going on. the blame game has begun and the truth is, mr. deputy speaker, the chancellor is last. not because of his judgment but because of pride, not because of the facts but the ideology. country wantse him, or the party, but because he is the prime minister's last line of defense. but bolus and boys are both in this together. understand, they don't understand, you need a recovery made by the many, not just a few people at the top. we have had new turns on charities and churches and caravans, but what is the one policy, what is the one policy that they are committed to. the top rate tax cut. speaker, john the banker? remember him. he has had a tough year with 1 million pounds. what does he get? of 42,000e tax cut pounds next year. half thousand pounds. double the average wage. that are ofe -- little better, bringing home 5 million pounds per year. the prime minister does not like to hear what he agreed to. 250,000t of nearly pounds. and at the same time, everyone else pays the price. the chancellor is giving with one
to listen to the message you have about the economy, about health care, about education. because they're so turned off by the rhetoric about illegal immigration. and that i think is what ari and the republican party is talking about now. >> so john berman has covered politics for a gazillion years. richard, you are my nonpolitico. are you moved? is there a sense of a relaunch? >> i'm the type of person that i'm to be persuaded, right some but to me, i know especially this 18 to 29 group, i just feel like it seems like marketing. and i hear the word brand and to me that makes it seem that it's not authentic. so i think social issues, but this idea of the package and -- it just seems like a branding and a marketing thing and i think a lot of young people are pretty wise to that sort of approach. >> so let's go right back then to jake. when you look at the cpac, right, and the straw poll that came out of that, you had rand paul winning with 25%, right behind was marco rubio, something like 23%. and you had contra ticker to me contradictory messages. again, polar opposites on the state of the r
international. helping survivors of war and conflict. finance international providing financial education to children around the world. >> that's great. >> right out of the gates, we've got the nasdaq composite down by a little bit more than 1%. feeling the brunt of the losses early on in trading. >> isn't that funny? >> google was, frankly, was there a note last week that they didn't talk about, that google may have trouble making -- look, i'm just pointing out that there is an old -- new tech came under pressure last week at the same time that the western digitals and the sandesk. >> i can say something about google for a second? >> no. i'm sorry. 2 got zero play and nobody cared. i'm the only one that scared now it's ebay. >> and it came out with a big report that basically said in their testing, paid search which is 90% of google's revenue. >> yes. >> made no impact on click through rates or results. that basically free, just being out there with your meditags and everything else was just as good as paid search. it had all of these algorithms and i didn't understand half of it, but i
where there is underemployment, nonfunctioning educational resources, people in need and in poverty and without hope where crime is high. i'm sure those were the things that he was concerned about, or at least some of them. i'm concerned about them as well. the problem is, is that there are no quick fixes to poverty and to educational systems that haven't worked for decades. we have to work on those things diligently, consistently and every day and that's what we're trying to do. >> mayor sly james, the most poised, calmest, coolest mayor on the planet. >> former marine. there's some marine training in there i have a feeling. >> thanks for joining us this morning. really appreciate it. >>> ahead on "starting point." take a look at this. it's all about guns in america as democrats drop the assault weapon ban. it says shame on us, assault weapons bill is dead. and senate vendors asurrenders wins. >>> adrian dantley from the street corner. yes, the nba hall of famer will tell us how he's giving back. and this is really a surprise. if youthen this willbrids arbe a nice surprise. meet th
is joining us from huber, n.c. caller: the real problem is that we do not educate our children and young people about guns and how to respect them. and how to properly use one. family does not own a gun, the chances of your child going into a house with guns is very high. they have been a part of america for a long time. we need to educate our young people on the dangers of them. host: thank you for the call. from our facebook page, tracy has this point of view. of these mass shootings were care -- host: bill joins us on the phone from wichita, kansas. your thoughts on this? caller code to me it is light brown 3, bomb in the record, here we go again. three,s like round the bumping up the record, here we go again. what -- where in the world are the parents of these kids? especially this one in georgia with the poor baby who was shot and killed. what is a 13-year-old and 16- year-old kid doing with an unloaded handgun? figure this out. it has to go back to the parents. i would like to see the parents of those kids that killed that us, anyoneur else, i do not care. where were you at when th
million worth of shares. some of the $1.9 billion from the education business. the shares are down 12% year-to-date. you can see up 3.5. we're watching smithfield foods. smithfield foods have hired goldman sachs in order to weigh some strategic options including breaking up the company. this is according to reuters. smithfield foods up on this news, up about 3% on the day. back to you. tracy: thanks, nicole. we'll see you at the top of the hour. ashley: march madness is in full swing and cbs and turner scooping up millions of eyeballs tuning into the turn any but now there is speculation that the final four coverage could move to cable as early as next year. dennis kneale covering this story and joins us now. dennis. >> hello, ashley. kind of a good news, bad news thing for cbs because they're raking in some really good ratings so far in the first week of march madness, the college basketball tournament. cb. is putting out a press release moments ago saying this is some of the highest ratings that the basketball product has brought in over 20 years. just one problem, variety, the trad
's excited to be back in school and wants girls everywhere to have the same opportunity of an education. >>> a new government estimate out this morning says 1 in 50 schoolchildren in the u.s. has autism, a previous estimate put the number at 1 in 88. the cdc says its new numbers do not necessarily mean autism is occurring more often but it may indicate it is being diagnosed more frequently than before. the estimate suggests at least 1 million american children have autism. >>> and a puppy named pachino may be too young to learn new tricks, trying to figure out how to catch. take a look. >> one, two, three. catch. >> oh. poor thing. the trick will take some work but pachina has already become a big dog online getting a lot of hits for that. >> adorable. he plays dead i guess. >> working the kinks out. >> 11 minutes after the hour. >> trying. >> very cute. let's check in with dylan dreyer, made it back out on our rock park today. >> i love being outside at rock park and you guys too, getting real flowers and fake flowers, so many things given out and helping to keep people warm because it
public accountants. i said, listen, you're an educated guy. you must have had a lot of wealthy clients and business people. here's what he said. >> all the assurances they get from european officials was that their deposits are not at risk. there may be other need for additional taxes for significant government cuts. the loans actually supports their banking system. but there was never discussion of any cut on depolisitsdeposit >> in other words, they were expecting traditional types of austerity. when we have more news we'll get it to you. >> let's cross over to moscow with steve sedgwick. we used to be colleagues in london for a long time. i know you've done a lot of reporting in moscow. isn't it the case that the russians will string the cypriots along here? they will get much more if they need to when the banking system collapses if that's where we're headed. surely. >> yeah, simon, you make a very good point. there's a lot of people thinking, what's the gain? they've already let the money back in 2011, they led with 2.5 billion euros. so extending that and the term on that, reduci
and sidewalk chalk and make things a little educational so they can learn something. >> a little bin you can get from your drug store. >> my easter basket was like an ashtray. that's what i got. >> that one's coming. hopefully we'll make it to that one. and then we've got our green thumb basket. this is fun. with spring, it's here. it's warmer in san diego where i'm from. i have to tell you. >> this is i know, a little chilly. >> can you use it for your hair. >> and shampoo. >> and we do have one little candy item, little gummy worms to go with it lots of cute stuff here. and then this works in san diego, here it's wishful thinking, but we'll get there eventually. we have our fun in the sun, fill it with little beach toys and sunglasses and we have of course, swedish fish. >> are those in there? yes. >> those -- >> they're just your size. >> why are these my size? these are for like a 5-year-old. am i a shrinking person? >> your head is small. >> it was all of those clinical trials i did to pay for college. i'm like benjamin button, i'm getting smaller. >> and last we have our baker-to-be ba
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